Summer of Reading

Summer of Reading
With school ending, many parents ask, “What can I do to keep my kids reading this summer?”
 Below you’ll find resources, both locally and nationwide, to encourage reading over the long summer break. Check out local libraries, bookstores, recommended summer reading lists and information just for parents!

Seattle Public Library: Kiddos of all ages can keep up with their reading, earn prizes and attend free programs throughout the Seattle area.
King County Library: Earn badges online and keep track of the books you’ve read with this cool chart! Stop by any King County Library location to get started!
Everett Public Library: The Everett Public Library offers summer reading programs for both children and teens, with a suggested reading goal of 24 hours.
Sno-Isle Library: Enter to win a new bicycle by participating in the summer reading program at Sno-Isle Libraries.
Pierce County Library: Kids win prizes for every five hours they read, including a free pass to Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium or Northwest Trek and a Round Table Pizza coupon.

Do you need book suggestions for summer? Check out UW Bookstore’s site. Earn cool prizes and get your All Access Pass!
The Elliott Bay Book Company is hosting its summer reading program. All kids between the ages of 6 and 14 are invited to help recommend some great books for other children.

The Feed Your Brain Summer Reading program at Half Price Books, for kids ages 14 and younger, includes reading at least 15 minutes a day (or getting read to, if your kids are still learning).
Earn a free book AND find all the latest book recommendations at your local Barnes and Noble!
Do you want to help break a reading world record? Visit the Scholastic Summer Reading site, log your minutes and help to make history!

American Library Association
    
Grades K – 2
    
Grades 3 – 5
    
Grades 6 – 8
New York Public Library
    
Grades K – 1
    
Grades 2 – 3
    
Grades 4 – 5
    
Grades 6 – 8

San Francisco Public Library
    Children
    Teens
    Adults

The Horn Book
    
Overview List
    
Picture Books
    
Middle School Fiction & Non-fiction

Education World
    
Kindergarten
    
1st Grade
    
2nd Grade
    
3rd Grade
    
4th Grade
    
5th Grade
    
6th Grade
    
7th Grade
    
8th Grade

Scholastic
    Overview List


Seattle Public Library
    
Coming soon!

Blackout Poetry

Whoa! It’s been an insane month of loosing my mother-in-law, driving cross-country, signing a new contract for the coming school year and welcoming my husband home after being on the road for five weeks. Sigh. Needless to say, I have been neglecting this here blog. So, to get back into it, I thought I would post an overview of the coolest type of poetry I have ever seen!
 
Austin Kleon, the author of Newspaper Blackout (as well as a number of other awesome art-inspiring titles) is the guru of blackout poetry. His Newspaper Blackout site is pure awesomeness. He has the ability to make something surprisingly hard to do, look incredibly easy.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Happy Birthday to You, Dr. Seuss

My dear librarian friend and Dr. Seuss happen to share birthdays (well, almost) and I was digging deep into the recesses of my brain to come up with something worthy of both extraordinary librarian friend and the one-and-only Dr. Seuss. Well, this is what I came up with…

My Head of School once made the comment, “I thought I was crazy, then I met Becky” is now documented as justifiable. But, I love my job (and my friends) and if that makes me a little bit crazy, then so be it.

 
I did, in fact, do a live version of the birthday song for the entire lower school (to honor Dr. Seuss, of course) and it was a bit hit. Well, except for the kid that came up to me afterwards and said, “Oh my gosh. I’m so embarrassed for you.”
 

My Librarian Heart is Singing

I recently accompanied my eighth grade seminar students and their (amazingly brilliant) language arts teacher, Ms. E, to our (gigantic, beautiful, breathtaking) downtown library. It was such a rich experience, for both the adults and the students. I truly believe it should be a once a week occurrence. Okay, yeah right, but a librarian can dream! At the beginning of the year, each student chose a topic and has been formulating questions and developing outlines based on that topic. Ms. E and I team-taught a quick demonstration on how to search for books in the downtown library and students then conducted their searches and made lists of books they would like to look for the following day.
After boarding the city bus (even this part was a great experience, the kids were awesome and the bus driver was friendly), we took a quick ride downtown and arrived at the library. Ms. E separated the kids into small groups based on like-call numbers. Once inside, groups helped one another locate their books. Seeing as how the non-fiction section is two (huge) floors, I was super impressed how the students managed their time, helped one another and came back to a central location when they’d found what they needed. I was also giddy to see the kids asking the public librarians questions and thanking them for their help (yippie!!!).
It gets even better… All of the kids found books for their topic, two students signed up for library cards (every student has an active library card with the city or county library, but some of them have gotten to the age where they can get a card independent from their parents and they were excited to take advantage of that privilege), they were desperate to go to the Young Adult section and check out the fiction books, and they continued to ask to check out additional books they discovered (not for their projects, just because they wanted them!). Big, big sigh. This was such an amazing experience. They learned so much and had fun doing it. It makes my heart sing. And THAT is why I think it should be a once a week outing. I’m just saying…
 
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